Seniors / Aging News

Tackling Delirium

A new national plan of action provides a roadmap for improving the care of patients with delirium, a poorly understood and often unrecognized brain condition that affects approximately seven million hospitalized Americans each year.

"Delirium: A Strategic Plan to Bring an Ancient Disease into the 21st Century," written on behalf of the American Delirium Society, appears in the supplement to the Nov. 2011 issue of the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society. Publication of the supplement, "Advancing Delirium Science: Systems, Mechanisms and Management" was supported by the John A. Hartford Foundation.

Clionsky Neuro Systems (CNS-Neuro) Announces Publication Of Study Finding Elderly Patients Unable To Recognize Their Memory Loss

Mitchell Clionsky, Ph.D. and Emily Clionsky, M.D. of CNS-Neuro, announced new data supporting the use of screening tests to identify cognitive loss in older Americans. Their study asked two hundred elderly patients and their families to rate how well they think and remember. They found that the patients' answers had no relationship to their tested cognitive ability, that the relatives were minimally better, and that doctors should measure cognition rather than asking about it during the Annual Wellness Visit. These findings, published in the November 2011 Journal of Family Practice may help doctors decide which of their patients need treatment for memory loss. Memory Orientation Screening Test (MOST™) gives doctors accurate tools for Annual Wellness Visit.

A Harder Old Age Faced By Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual And Transgender Seniors

Aging and health issues facing lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender baby boomers have been largely ignored by services, policies and research. These seniors face higher rates of disability, physical and mental distress and a lack of access to services, according to the first study on aging and health in these communities.

The study, led by Karen Fredriksen-Goldsen and colleagues at the University of Washington's School of Social Work, indicates that prevention and intervention strategies must be developed to address the unique needs of these seniors, whose numbers are expected to double to more than 4 million by 2030.


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