Pediatrics / Children's Health News

Chronic Missed Naps Could Put Toddlers At Risk For Mood-Related Problems Later In Life

A new study led by the University of Colorado Boulder could be a wake-up call for parents of toddlers: Daytime naps for your kids may be more important than you think.

The study shows toddlers between 2 and a half and 3 years old who miss only a single daily nap show more anxiety, less joy and interest and a poorer understanding of how to solve problems, said CU-Boulder Assistant Professor Monique LeBourgeois, who led the study. The results indicate insufficient sleep alters the facial expressions of toddlers - exciting events are responded to less positively and frustrating events are responded to more negatively, she said.

How Moms Talk Influences Children's Perspective-Taking Ability

Young children whose mothers talk with them more frequently and in more detail about people's thoughts and feelings tend to be better at taking another's perspective than other children of the same age.

That's what researchers from the University of Western Australia found in a new longitudinal study published in the journal Child Development.

"Parents who frequently put themselves in someone else's shoes in conversations with their children make it more likely that their children will be able to do the same," according to Brad Farrant, postdoctoral fellow at the Telethon Institute for Child Health Research at the University of Western Australia, the study's lead author.

Study Points To Long-Term Recall Of Very Early Experiences

Most adults can't recall events that took place before they were 3 or 4 years old - a phenomenon called childhood amnesia. While some people can remember what happened at an earlier age, the veracity of their memories is often questioned. Now a new longitudinal study has found that events experienced by children as young as 2 can be recalled after long delays.

The study, by researchers at the University of Otago (in New Zealand), appears in the journal Child Development.


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