Neurology / Neuroscience News

New Research Helps Explain How The Brain Decides What Is A Face And What Just Resembles One

Objects that resemble faces are everywhere. Whether it's New Hampshire's erstwhile granite "Old Man of the Mountain," or Jesus' face on a tortilla, our brains are adept at locating images that look like faces. However, the normal human brain is almost never fooled into thinking such objects actually are human faces.

"You can tell that it has some 'faceness' to it, but on the other hand, you're not misled into believing that it is a genuine face," says Pawan Sinha, professor of brain and cognitive sciences at MIT.

Memory Loss In Older Adults May Be Improved By Nicotine Patches

Wearing a nicotine patch may help improve memory loss in older adults with mild cognitive impairment, according to a study published in Neurology, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology.

The study looked at individuals with mild cognitive impairment (MCI), the stage between normal aging and dementia when others begin to notice that an individual is developing mild memory or thinking problems. Many older adults with MCI go on to develop Alzheimer's disease.

Study Suggests Potential For Reversing Age-Associated Effects In Multiple Sclerosis Patients

New research highlights the possibility of reversing ageing in the central nervous system for multiple sclerosis (MS) patients. The study is published in the journal Cell Stem Cell.

As we get older, our bodies' ability to regenerate decreases. This is not only true for our skin (which is evident in the wrinkles that develop as we age) but also true for other tissues in the body, including the regenerative processes in the brain. For diseases which often span several decades and are affected by regenerative processes, such as multiple sclerosis, this can have massive implications.


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