Lymphology / Lymphedema News

New, Noninvasive Way To Identify Lymph Node Metastasis

Using two cell surface markers found to be highly expressed in breast cancer lymph node metastases, researchers at Moffitt Cancer Center, working with colleagues at other institutions, have developed targeted, fluorescent molecular imaging probes that can non-invasively detect breast cancer lymph node metastases. The new procedure could spare breast cancer patients invasive and unreliable sentinel lymph node (SLN) biopsies and surgery-associated negative side effects.

Their study was published in a recent issue of Clinical Cancer Research (18:1), a publication of the American Association for Cancer Research.

Patients With Limited-Stage Hodgkin's Lymphoma Have Increased Survival Rates When Treated With Chemotherapy Alone

New research led by the NCIC Clinical Trials Group (CTG) at Queen's University has proven patients with limited stage Hodgkin's lymphoma have a better chance of long-term survival if they undergo a standard chemotherapy regimen as opposed to radiation-based treatment.

"These results will influence current treatment practices and lead to more patients being treated with chemotherapy alone," says Dr. Ralph Meyer, professor of oncology at Queen's and director of the NCIC CTG. "This trial exemplifies the importance of academic groups conducting trials that assess long-term patient outcomes."

Identification Of Two Molecules That Kill Lymphoma Cells In Mice Generates Potential For New Anti-Cancer Therapies

Researchers at the University of Southern California have identified two molecules that may be more effective cancer killers than are currently available on the market.

The peptides, molecules derived from a cancer-causing virus, target an enzyme in cancerous cells that regulates a widely researched tumor suppressor protein known as p53. The peptides inhibit the enzyme, causing p53 levels in cancer cells to rise, which leads to cell death. Lymphoma tumors in mice injected with the two peptides showed marked regression with no significant weight-loss or gross abnormalities.

The discovery is detailed in the journal Nature Structural & Molecular Biology, which posted online on Sunday, Nov. 6.


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